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The 7 Steps to Perfect Health, Chapter 1

A Practical Guide to Mental, Physical, and Spiritual Wellness by Dr.Gary Null

Step 1 – Beginning the Road to Wellness



This is a program for making yourself well. It’s about opening yourself up to positive energy instead of focusing on the negative. Given the fact that whatever you invest with energy increases its power, when you build on feeling good about your life and health, you’ll become healthier. Conversely, if you’re preoccupied with fighting off illness and stress, you’ll feel stress and ill health. How does this translate into practical terms? It means moving toward having strong stamina instead of always feeling fatigued and exhausted. It means that when you have a cold it only lasts a few days instead of a week or more. It means having the energy for life instead of constantly dragging yourself to doctors for chronic problems. It means taking time for yourself instead of always thinking you have to do more for others. As long as disease and depression are getting more of your energy than wellness and happiness, the problematic aspects of your life will only continue. That’s when ill health starts to spread and take over your world.

How We Achieve Wellness

 The 7 Steps to Perfect Health is the program through which you can feel that coveted sense of well-being. It will not teach you how to cure diseases resulting from toxins, but it will teach you how to replace those toxins with life-giving energy and nutrients. First, you have to understand what you’re doing now to prevent wellness:
  • Eating too many processed, refined foods, animal fats, and sugar
  • Consuming meat, poultry, and dairy products
  • Drinking caffeine and alcohol
  • Not drinking sufficient quantities of fluids daily such as clean water and vegetable juices
  • Not getting the right nutrients into your body
  • Not coping positively with work and family problems
  • Not being mindful of your own needs
  • Not taking the time to be still in your busy life—you’re overstressed
Chances are if you’re not paying attention to the destructive aspects of your diet and lifestyle, you’re not paying attention to what your body is telling you when you suffer from chronic back pain, gastrointestinal distress, constipation, insomnia, and the more serious conditions of heart disease, arthritis, diabetes, and cancer. When you suffer too much, your body and your unconscious mind are telling you to stop what you’re doing and change your habits. When you change your habits properly, you can reverse deteriorating health and prevent chronic conditions from taking root. You will feel better.

Foods That Hurt

 The American diet is loaded with refined and processed foods. But the very nature of processing strips food of its nutrients through agitation, pressure, and extreme temperature changes. More importantly, processed and packaged foods are packed with unnatural additives and preservatives, artificial colorings, sugars and fats. This leaves the final product almost devoid of any nutrient value. Our bodies crave these products for the taste and convenience, and then in a hunt for the vital nutrients we need, we eat more and more of them. Many food companies try to compensate for their inferior processed food products by so-called “fortification,” whereby small amounts of nutrients are added to foods. In the end they may remove forty nutrients and all the enzymes, replacing them with ten. (Or even less: many processed foods offer one fortified vitamin or mineral, which is touted on the package as a way to seem like a vital, healthy product.) This fortification by subtraction does little good for us. The lack of essential nutrients in pastas, breads, sugar, and grains means your vital organs are not being fed the ideal foods they can use. Many processed foods include partially hydrogenated vegetable oil.  These oils are a main contributor to the production of trans fat in humans; trans fat is known to trigger heart disease, diabetes and Alzheimer’s.   Sodium nitrate (frequently found in lunch meats to preserve their pinkish color) turns into nitrosamine after consumption, and nitrosamine is a known carcinogen.  Aspartame has long been considered a cancer-causing agent: once in the body it turns into formaldehyde, a carcinogen, as well as embalming fluid.  Artificial coloring, particularly citrus red 2 is also a cancer causing agent.1 Processed foods dominate the American diet, and may be the most significant source of sugars, bad fats, and harmful additives in your daily meals. As health writer Melissa Knopper points out, even processed foods sold at “green” health food stores can contain these harmful elements.2  She notes that even the most stringent government regulators fail to understand the “synergistic effects of multiple food additives.”3 In other words, the combination of so-called “safe” additives and preservatives (along with allergy-causing elements) together in one meal could trigger negative health effects in an otherwise healthy person. The continued ingestion of these additives in processed foods leads to life-long health problems. Some of the worst food additives regularly contained in processed foods are:

Partially hydrogenated or hydrogenated vegetable oil

These common oils, by producing trans fats, have been linked to heart disease, Alzeimer’s, and diabetes as well as a number of other health problems, as mentioned above. They can be found in popular snack foods, packaged desserts, and fried food in the freezer section or at your local diner. Sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate Sodium nitrite, used by meat manufacturers to keep old meat products from turning gray at your grocery store, becomes nitrosamine when ingested by humans. Nitrosamine is a carcinogen. By eating foods laced with nitrates on a regular basis, the risk of developing cancer is multiplied.4  Aspartame (found in Equal, NutraSweet)- While companies with an interest in the selling of aspartame in their products have insisted the artificial sweetener is safe for human consumption, an overwhelming number of scientific studies support the contrary. One such study, performed in Italy in 2005, showed that rats who consume aspartame regularly are three to four times as likely to develop leukemia or lymphoma.5 Knopper points out that, “Dr. Samuel S. Epstein, chairman of the Chicago-based Cancer Prevention Coalition, believes there is enough evidence to ban aspartame already. Aspartame breaks down into formaldehyde in the body, he explains, Formaldehyde, the same chemical used in embalming fluid, is a well-known carcinogen.”6  Artificial coloring, food dyes In some children, food dyes like Blue 1 and Blue 2 are linked to hyperactivity. Many common dyes have not been fully tested for their effect on human health. Processed foods are especially rife with food dyes and artificial colorings because their producers want to appear as if they are offering real, fresh, foods to consumers. You can bet that if the food you’re about to eat lists a number of these dyes on its label, then it is probably not a wholesome product. Knopper warns that food manufacturers often use dishonest terms like “natural flavors” and “natural colorings,” which aren’t necessarily healthy or natural. Similarly, unhealthy additives like MSG can be masked under the terms yeast extract, chicken broth, and hydrolyzed vegetable protein.7 The best way to avoid these processed-food tricks? Buy fresh local produce, skip the frozen prepared meals, and dump out all that soda and packaged desserts. The problem with processed foods was dramatized in the 1970s when many Asian refugees were dying from Sudden Unexpected Death Syndrome. Originally the cause was thought to be the stress of adapting to a new culture, but upon closer examination, it became clear that it was because their diet consisted mainly of refined white rice. In their native countries, they were accustomed to eating whole grain rice which contains all the vital nutrients, including complete protein. However, processed white rice is virtually empty of nutritional value because the very important thiamine—which helps your heart pump properly—and vitamin B2 and 6 have been removed. Processing may in addition kill off nutrients and food factors that have not yet been identified. But this form of malnutrition affects us all:
  • Low levels of selenium—which is stripped out of refined foods—have been correlated with cancer.
  • Manganese deficiencies, which are rampant in America, are associated with irregular heartbeats, muscle fatigue, and insomnia.
  • The lack of B vitamins in our processed-food diet leads to fatigue, mental impairment, and a weakened cardiovascular system.
  • Calcium-fortified products are often missing the other nutrients that help the body process calcium for stronger bones and teeth such as boron, silica, manganese, phospherous and magnesium. In fact, the foods often inhibit calcium absorption in spite of using the nutrient as a top selling-point.
  • Important nutrients like quercetin (found most predominately in fresh onions and apples) are missing from this processed and packaged American diet altogether.
  • Organic roughage (quality fiber), which is so important to a healthy, functioning body, is deficient to the labels of processed foods.
One of the biggest hurdles we all have to jump if we’re ever going to say goodbye to this dangerous lifestyle of processed junk food is that some of us, under 40 years of age, grew up in a processed-food world. We are sentimentally attached to our sugar-coated, fat-laden, nutrient-thin comfort foods because they were our favorites as children. Even worse, they were often our mothers’ favorites when were not yet born. The effect of a maternal “junk food” diet (comprised of processed foods) was studied, and researchers concluded that maternal malnutrition (caused by a processed food/junk diet) has been shown to negatively affect muscle force production in the progeny.  This has been shown to adversely correlate in an individual’s exercise capacity, diminishing the child’s ability to fight obesity.  In other words, mothers who eat processed foods while pregnant may be causing their children to have a proclivity towards obesity.8  While promoting overeating and preference for “junk food” in the mother, this type of diet promotes the retaining of fat and weakening of muscular strength in the child. Thanks to sedentary lifestyles and high-energy, low-nutrient diets, many mothers are passing along bad health to their kids without knowing it. That’s why changing your diet and overall health at any age is important. Researchers have shown that pregnant rats will gravitate toward the junk food and ignore their healthy regular foods during gestation when given a choice (similar to the “cravings” felt by humans).9 This leads to a vicious cycle of junk processed foods, childhood obesity, and generational bad health. But you can’t blame everything on mother, right? Eating processed foods is also a matter of convenience. We’re surrounded by them. However much they may lack in true nutritional value, they are relatively inexpensive and filling. These products are promoted heavily on TV and in the supermarket, and any health claims they may have (however bogus) are touted on the labels. Still, we can turn away from them. We can toss out all that empty junk food and reach for natural whole foods full of the vital nutrients meant for human sustenance. And we must do so if we want to live a long, healthy, and productive life.

Toxins and Your Health

Environmental chemicals and pollutants also have an effect on your overall health. While diet is unquestionably important, the increasing accumulation of pesticide and herbicide wastes in our environment have drastically changed human health over the last fifty years. Many researchers are now engaged in finding out how this environmental exposure couples with diet and nutrition to raise the risk of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular ailments, cancer, and other issues.10  Since many of these pollutants bioaccumulate in our bodies over long-term exposure, it is paramount to remove them from your personal environment as soon as possible. Often, pollutants like heavy metals and other elements diminish the level of anti-oxidants in the body, increasing the likelihood of cancer even for those following a seemingly healthy diet.11 But researchers have found that nutrition can modulate environmental toxicity.12 First, by lowering the level of sugars and fats taken in through processed foods and increasing the number of organic fruits and vegetables eaten each day, you can actually lower the amount of pollutants entering your body. Vegetables and fruits are  a prime source of anti-oxidants, vitamins and minerals that are usually not found in processed, pre-packaged foods. Examining the correlation between nutrition and chemical toxicity, researchers suggest that adverse health conditions may increase with the consumption of certain dietary fats (frequently found in processed foods).  Conversely, the study also suggested that the ingestion of fruits and vegetables provides “protection” from those same adverse health effects.  As if this weren’t enough, researchers also assert that proper diets could, to some degree, reverse the damaging effects of environmental pollutants.13 This means that a way to guard against the pollutants now in our air, water, homes, and food supply is to turn to a healthier diet based on natural, whole and organic foods. By focusing our diet on fruits, vegetables, legumes and whole grains, nuts and seeds and tubers or root vegetables, as well as sea vegetables, we can actually build up a defense against the toxicity of our troubled world.

Reconnecting to Natural Living

During childhood, my family depended on many natural cures and treatments. I remember a time of serious flu epidemic. As a preventive measure, my mother applied a mustard plaster—a vapor rub made of mustard and horseradish—to my chest. It burned and stung, but I didn’t get sick. On a daily basis, she’d also give me cod liver oil. I hated it. But now we know how rich cod liver oil is in vitamins A and D. My family also ate onions regularly to prevent illness. Whenever I had a high temperature, my mother would place an onion plaster on my forehead. She’d make a poultice of onion and garlic to bring down a fever as well. She would make hot apples cider with raw honey and bee propolis, three times a day. It seems that people once possessed a kind of innate wisdom about how to live long, healthy lives before the age of processed foods and chemicals. This simple wisdom, combined with all we know today about the value of juices and nutrients, makes us particularly well equipped to give ourselves longevity, energy, stamina, and a sense of well-being. Though Western medicine has made many great strides in the last century, it has failed to fully treat the individual in a preventive manner or take into account the causes of human ailments. Rather, some of , non-energy, Western medicine (the kind practiced in most hospitals and supported by the pharmaceutical industry) focuses simply on battling the symptoms that surface thanks to more complicated inner factors. Traditional, Eastern, and homeopathic approaches have a different methodology. Much like my mother’s cures, this methodology is largely focused on curing the individual’s particular ailment, whether that is environmental toxicity, nutritional imbalance, emotional stress, or another factor. Often given the name “alternative medicine,” it encompasses a broad number of approaches to human health that include:
  • Herbal therapies: My mother’s creations were a type of herbal therapy. These methods hold that alternate, naturally-occurring herbs are potent forms of medicine in their own right, and far safer than “modern” pharmaceuticals. Many of their curative powers have been utilized for centuries around the world.
  • Nutritional therapies: Much of this book will discuss nutritional therapies. Because our bodies are directly impacted by our eating habits, it is no surprise that bad food leads to bad health. But did you know you can directly influence your body’s functioning and make a healthier, longer life by choosing what goes on your table?
  • Detoxification: This is a process by which a person clears out the toxins derived from food and other elements through the help of a number of therapies, while at the same time making conscious decisions to eat a simple but diverse diet of fruits and vegetables. Detoxification is of prime importance to the creation of your perfect health.
  • Homeopathy: Homeopathic remedies stimulate the body’s natural immune system response by focusing on the whole body. Practitioners of homeopathy determine what needs to be healed in a person through knowledge of mind, body, and spirit, then concoct the remedy most similar to what ails them. Homeopathy was brought about when a German physician 200 years ago felt that his medical training was doing more harm than good—now Samuel Hahnemann is considered the father of “homeopathy”.14
  • Acupuncture and alternative testing: We will discuss these alternate methods for clearing the body’s systems and testing for hormonal, blood, and other imbalances throughout the book. Often, these complementary approaches help a complementary physician get to the bottom of a patient’s true physiological state.
  • Meditation and exercise: It is a commonplace these days to be told that relaxation and regular cardiovascular exercise are central to optimum health. But it took the voice of complementary practitioners, nutritionists, and conscious citizens to make this so. Our shared health challenges, however, will take a continued focus on these two integral activities if we want to build a healthier, happier society.
When “modern” medicine fails, or pharmaceutical agents are unsatisfactory, alternative or traditional medicine steps in to provide treatment.15 But Western medical practitioners are often resistant to these “alternative” approaches. This is because of a philosophical disagreement between the two camps. Western medicine holds that it is based purely on logic and science, and that alternative approaches are steeped in spiritual practices rather than what they deem to be material facts. On the other hand, the “alternative” side sees the shortcomings in a style of medical practice that is wholly dependent on dangerous pharmaceuticals and only interested in symptoms rather than prevention, reduction of toxicity, and whole-body health. There is increasing evidence, however, that this hard-line division is softening up.16 More and more Western practitioners are seeing the benefits of alternative medicine, and patients are beginning to understand that the two approaches actually complement one another to the benefit of life-long health. Dr. Maurice M. Iwu explains that: Developments in human genomics have shown that no two individuals are identical in their composition, yet in a fundamental sense, all living organisms share the same building units. This new insight into the nature of life is more in accordance with the traditional belief in the role of biological energy systems and order in healing, which raises the hope that, some day, science may develop a method for proper assessment and understanding of traditional medical practices.17  This shift to a more complementary form of medicine is already on the rise in less industrialized nations throughout the world, where a combination of traditional practices and modern science are used to bring about the best possible health in patients.18 Perhaps Western society could learn from this more holistic approach to human health as it tries to deal with the massive healthcare problems facing it in a new century. Already, hospitals in America are beginning to offer holistic “alternative” therapies. Tampa General Hospital and St. Joseph’s Hospital (both in Tampa, Florida) have joined the ranks of Western practitioners taking on a complementary approach to alternative medicine. Tampa General calls its program Integrative Medicine, a project that according to its website, “combines the science and technology of traditional health care with safe and effective complementary therapies to provide comfort, healing and well-being. The idea behind integrative medicine is not to forgo the benefits of traditional treatments with techniques that include a holistic approach to the body, mind, spirit and emotions.”19 These types of complementary, integrated programs are popping up around the country. A similar program at the Carillon Wellness Center (St. Petersburg) offers pre-natal yoga classes, massage therapy, group fitness programs, as well as nutrition and wellness services.20 Kimberly Gray, coordinator for the TGH Integrative Medicine Program, has found that the more complementary approach empowers patients to take charge of their health situation: “They actually become accountable and instead of just becoming recipients of health care techniques; they become part of their healing process.”21 You can help start this change now by talking to friends, insurance providers, and doctors about a more inclusive approach to medical practice, and by doing your part to eat a diet that is good for your body, practicing methods to reduce stress, removing toxins from your personal environment, and getting regular cardiovascular exercise. Dr. Mehmet Oz defines the difference between healing and curing.  He believes energy healing is the medicine of the future because it heals, rather than cures symptoms.22

Phytochemicals to Reverse the Aging Process

The curative powers of those mustard plasters my mother used were no accident. Powerful elements were at work. Healing is not just about overcoming degenerative diseases. It’s about reversing the aging process, about rejuvenating. If refined, processed foods can hurt you, natural foods can heal—and they are powerful. Phytochemicals—which protect plants from harmful substances—are found in fruits and vegetables and help protect our bodies against viruses, bacteria, yeast, and molds. There are hundreds of phytochemicals within each fruit or vegetable, and each helps specific cells to do their job. For example, there are 150 phytochemicals in the fig, and one of them has been shown to prevent cancer. Green juices are filled with chlorophyll, a great blood cleanser. Orange foods such as carrots contain carotenoids, which are anticarcinogenic. Phytochemicals help our DNA, which means they actually can repair a damaged cell. When cells are damaged, they become weak links, ultimately causing the body to break down and speed up the aging process. Here are a few of the other powerful benefits of fruit and vegetable phytochemicals recently discovered by health researchers:
  • According to the research and studies conducted by Gian Luigi Russo of the Institute of Food Sciences (National Research Council, Italy), dietary phytochemicals (as found in the increased consumption of fruit and vegetables) have been found to significantly reduce aging-related conditions, such as cancer, chronic diseases, and cardiovascular disease.23
  • The health benefits of phytochemicals are suggested to protect cellular systems from oxidative damage, lowering the risk of chronic diseases, as well as reduce the risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease (all age related concerns).24
  • In a joint study between the Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (Tufts University), and the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center (Denver, Colorado) supported by the US department of Agriculture, researches studied the connection between phytochemicals and reversing age-related declines. The conclusions of their study suggest that, not only do phytochemicals show beneficial effects on cancer and heart disease; they also may be beneficial in reversing age-related declines including neuronal and behavioral aging.  The anti-oxidant rich foods with phytochemicals used for the study were blueberries, spinach, and strawberry.25
  • A recent Japanese study showed that the intake of flavonoids like quercetin, myricetin, kaempferol, luteolin, and ficetin decreased total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol 26 Intake of quercetin alone was inversely related to total cholesterol and LDL plasma levels.27
  • A recent study found in the Journal of Neuroscience shows that phytochemicals found in foods rich in antioxidants have a direct relationship with the reversal of neuronal and behavioral aging.28 This means that “phytochemicals present in antioxidant-rich foods could be beneficial in forestalling functional age-related ”29
  • The benefits of increased levels of fruits and vegetables in the diet are of particular significance in the case of those suffering from Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s diseases.30 Because oxidative stress is linked to brain deterioration, the antioxidants in these natural foods have a direct relationship with healing the central nervous system.
  • The same study also showed that foods with high flavonoid levels (especially spinach and strawberries) actually help stave off brain aging over time. This means a healthy diet throughout life can pay off with longer clarity of mind and functionality.31
  • Researchers have shown that about 35% of cancer deaths are a result of nutritional factors. At the same time, chemoprevention (fighting off cancer before it takes hold in the body) depends largely on an increased diet of fruits and vegetables.32
These super-powered phytochemicals, then, have a deep impact on our total health. They provide necessary elements to the body, fight the process of aging, defend the brain and central nervous system, and help prevent cancer. So where can they be found? Some of the most important phytochemicals and their sources are listed here:
  • Lycopene (found in tomatoes)
  • Genistein (soybeans, soy products)
  • Proanthocyanidins (vegetables, fruits, black tea)
  • Resveratrol (grapes, grape seeds, red wine)
  • Curcumin (turmeric, curry, mustard)
  • Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (green tea)
  • Folic Acid (vegetables)
  • Vitamin E (vegetable oils)
  • Ascorbic Acid (vegetables and fruits)
  • Calcium (especially in dark leafy greens)
  • Selenium (vegetables, fruits, cereals, grains)
  • Quercetin (onions, apples)33
New research shows that much of the benefits of phytochemicals may come from the synergistic complement of a number of fruit and vegetable elements working together in concert.34  This means that a regular, diverse diet of fruits and vegetables increases the impact of phytochemicals on your overall health. This is one of the reasons you may have noticed stickers and signs at your local grocery store that promote the “5-a-Day” program for fruits and vegetables. Even the food establishment is coming around to see the benefits of a diet full of nutrient-rich fruits and vegetables. Research suggests that rather than simply adding phytochemical supplements to an average American diet, a radical shift toward whole, natural plant-based foods will have a much more comprehensive effect on your lifelong health.35 I believe we should eat 9-11 servings of vegetables and fruits each day.

Knowing Where You Stand Through Alternative Testing

To know how to detoxify, rebuild, and rejuvenate, you need to know where you stand. Improper levels of various substances can interfere with enzyme systems. For instance, susceptibility to food allergies can cause a multitude of ills. Few people know their cholesterol level. More importantly, they may not know the right way to look at cholesterol. To properly evaluate your cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels, which is “good” cholesterol, must be compared to the levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), “bad” cholesterol, the kind that can make you sick. The experts in the field of alternative testing are complementary or holistic doctors. Complementary physicians are more interested in following your medical history in detail; they are concerned with the chronology of symptomatology. When did the symptoms start? How did the symptoms develop? The complementary physician tries to correlate specific symptoms with the physiology of the body. For this, according to Dr. Martin Feldman, a complementary physician, the right tests are critical. Some of the diagnostic tests performed by traditional physicians and complementary physicians overlap, such as scratch tests for allergies, but most are completely different, using not only different techniques but different clues to establish the origin of a problem. For example, a holistic physician would use saliva instead of the traditional blood testing to determine levels of DHEA, testosterone, or estrogen, or he might use some other frontier laboratory tests.

Chronic Low Energy

We’re going to look at the chronic condition of low energy to show what options are available in testing. The traditional physician in this case would test the blood for low thyroid function, anemia, and Epstein-Barr virus. That’s as far as he or she might go. If the problem doesn’t show up there, the doctor might then conclude that since the low energy is not showing itself in any of the above diseases, it might be due to “just an emotional condition” or depressive state. However, there are far more possibilities for chronic low energy.

Food Allergies

Food allergies or food over-tolerance are possible hidden causes for low energy. To determine if allergies to certain foods are at the root of the problem, your doctor would ask that you keep a food diary in order to see not only what kinds of food you’re eating, but how much of each you consume. In some rare cases, severe allergies—commonly to nuts or fruits—can cause outbreaks of rash, itching, or, in more serious cases, difficulty breathing. More commonly, food allergies will manifest a few hours or even a day after consumption, which makes diagnosis more complicated. The physician will analyze the diary to consider whether you’re eating a particular food to excess. Perhaps you’re eating wheat two, three, or four times a day. That tends to correlate with an over-tolerance to that wheat. Perhaps you feel tired after eating a meal? This could result from a low blood sugar reaction to a particular food to which you may have an allergy; or, it could be due to an imbalance of glucose in your system. All of these food reactions can be tested without a laboratory in a carefully monitored “trial and error” effort in which you eliminate a food for 5 to 12 days and then reintroduce it at a “model meal” to see what happens. In the laboratory, an advanced level of allergy is often determined by an Immune Globulin Type E test (IgE). Classical allergy treatment considers a substance an allergen only if there’s an elevation in the IgE level. The IgG (another antibody test), however, is a more important measure because it can check allergy states that don’t show up on the IgE test. Other food allergy tests can include: cytotoxic food tests (which are not widely available), and intradermal testing, whereby a small amount of the food antigen is injected into the skin and the reaction is measured with a ruler. The advantage here is that the tester can test a dilution of the antigen to determine what an acceptable level of that substance is.36 Food allergies and allergic diseases inhibit the quality of life for many individuals, particularly in industrialized countries. Some recent research has shown the importance of the gestation period to a child’s later allergic behavior:
  • In a study conducted by Arne HØst and Susanne Halken, the correlation between allergic diseases and breastfeeding was examined.  Their research led them to suggest that breastfeeding for at least 4 months, combined with the introduction of solid foods is linked to a reduced risk of food allergy in infants.37  HØst and Halken also warn against processed, packaged baby formulas unless absolutely necessary. In this case, hydrolyzed formulas are acceptable.
  • Janet Dunstan and Susan Prescott assert that pregnant women may potentially prevent the development of allergic disease in their infants (as well as other immune-mediated diseases) through supplementing their diets with fish oil.38
  • The omega-3 fatty acid found in fish oil has been found to have a positive effect on fetal neural development, as well.39 Omega-3s also have an anti-inflammatory effect, are good for the immune system, and help regulate oxygen pathways.40
Health writer Karlene Karst explains the way food allergies take hold of our bodies in a succinct, easy-to-understand manner: A food allergy is an immune system response to food that the body believes is harmful. Once the immune system decides that a particular food is dangerous, it creates specific antibodies to defend itself. The next time a person eats that food, the immune system releases massive amounts of chemicals such as histamine in order to protect the body. These chemicals trigger a cascade of allergic symptoms that can affect the respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, skin, or cardiovascular system.41 Symptoms of food allergy range from sleepiness after eating or mild nausea to severe breathing problems, hives, and extreme intestinal reactions. The most important thing to remember is that food allergies can be treated through a correction of the immune system. The first step in this correction process, as mentioned above, is to find and remove the culprit food from your diet. This will allow your immune system to sort itself out. Wheat, dairy, eggs, and some citrus fruits and nuts are common sources of food allergy. The following nutritional supplements will aid in building up the immune system as you tackle your food allergy:
  • Multivitamins to prevent general vitamin and mineral deficiencies
  • Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids (found in evening primrose, flaxseed and fish oil) can help repair the gastrointestinal tract because of their anti-inflammatory nature
  • Digestive enzymes and probiotics to aid in gastrointestinal balance and repair42
  • Vitamin C for a boost to immune system strength - Glutamine 10 - Alpha Lipoic Acid
  • Magnesium helps with the peristaltic activity of the GI tract

Immune Disorders

As we’ve seen in our discussion of food allergies, the immune system is paramount in overall long-term health. And the next place to look for causes of a low-energy state would be the immune system. The conventional method for checking immune levels is to check the CBC blood count. In a healthy person, white blood cell count should be above 4.0. Any count below 3.5 of total white blood count would be considered an immune imbalance. Further, the lymphocyte percentage of the white count should be not more than 45 percent of the total. Any more would indicate an imbalance and indicate that the immune system is challenged. An immune system problem can also show itself through acupuncture. A sophisticated medical office can test the thymus energy field via acupuncture using either electrical or another meridian testing. If an immune problem does test positive, there are a number of fairly easy ways to rebuild it using fundamental nutrients: vitamins A, B-6, B-12, C, E, bioflavonoids, GLA (gamma-linolenic acid or evening primrose oil), and the minerals zinc and selenium. There are also many herbs that support the immune system. Thymus extract is available over-the-counter and can effect major repairs to an immune system that has gone awry. If the lymphatic system is off, as indicated by excessive CBC levels, jumping on a trampoline is an excellent way to get levels back on track. Finally, clean, filtered water boosts the immune system as well. Studies have suggested that there is a connection between chronic low energy conditions, such as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and an immune dysfunction.  In a study conducted by the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine at St. George’s University of London (conducted by Dr. Devanur and D. Kerr), they found that there is an important connection between the immune system and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.43  Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is typified by serious debilitating fatigue that lasts six or more months in a row.

 Infections

In the Devanur/Kerr study mentioned above, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome frequently begins with flu-like illnesses, leading researchers to assert that CFS is instigated by infection.  Researchers concluded that virus infections are likely to exist in CFS cases.44 Because CFS often causes severe cognitive problems for the sufferer, some researchers assert the instigating infection could have reached or started in the nervous system.45 However, emotional stress could play a large part in the process. Devanur and Kerr note that emotional stress is often seen as a source of CFS onset, while at the same time lowered immune system strength is associated with too much emotional stress.46 The two issues are probably related. Exposure to environmental toxins, often a source of immune system degradation, could also play a part in the development of CFS and other energy-leaching disorders. Toxins will be discussed later in greater detail. Epstein-Barr virus testing has only been a standard medical procedure for a couple of decades. Reading the tests properly is perhaps the most critical element for correct diagnosis. Many people test for elevated Epstein-Barr B virus antibodies through Immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels. Elevated levels denote prior exposure, anywhere from six months to ten years earlier. You could argue that the presence of IgG antibodies provides some protection against a new outbreak of Epstein-Barr. An elevated IgG indicates there is a current, new activity designating the viral infection is active, but at its early stage. This is treatable, but it is a more severe problem than the IgG numbers indicate. Herpes 6 CMV and Herpes 2 should also be tested—in the same herpes profile—as should other infections beside viral ones such as candida albicans, a yeast-like fungus. Candida overgrowth is a major problem in America today, largely due to intake of improper foods. Candida albicans is a normal substance found in the intestinal tract. However, low immunity, excess sugar intake, or use of antibiotics can cause an overgrowth of candida, which can be a cause of low energy. This can be tested via sophisticated stool or anal swab analysis. Once the level is known, correction is easily achieved by improving the diet and lifestyle, or by taking caprillic acid, a natural substance, not an antibiotic such as nystatin or others, which are over-prescribed and result in other problems.

Parasites

Parasites are also becoming endemic in America and may contribute to a fatigue syndrome. Somewhat difficult to test, they can be tracked through stool samples or anal swabs. One of the most important things to take into consideration when discussing parasites is that, as Dr. Majid Ali puts it, “A healthy bowel is inhospitable to parasites; an unhealthy bowel cannot keep them out.”48  He has noted that the World Health Organization recently found about 55% of the world’s population to be suffering by one sort of parasitic infection or another. Drugs have only a short-term effect on the problem. But with the help of healing nutritional therapies and radical changes in the diet, a healthy bowel will be reinvigorated and able to fend off any recurring parasites. In general, our nation’s health is being compromised by an increasing number of parasites and bacterial infections.49 But these issues can be turned around in the general population by turning around our eating habits and focusing on the practical health of our intestines.50  The issue is often a product of “Leaky Gut” syndrome, a condition by which consistent wear-and-tear coupled with unhealthy clearing of the bowel leads to leakage in the intestinal lining. Parasites and bacteria can take hold in this type of environment, which leads to symptoms ranging from weakness and fatigue to severe intestinal pains and the development of food allergies. A diet high in fiber, fluids, and with a balanced intake of magnesium is the first step toward bowel health.51

Nutritional Deficiencies

Deficiencies in such nutrients as vitamin B-6, all B-complex vitamins, and especially vitamin B-12, can contribute to low energy. This can be tracked simply by looking at the CBC blood count. However, interpretation is everything: if the red blood cells are enlarged to where the MCV line (Mean Corpuscular Volume) is above 98 to 100, this is highly correlated to a B-12 deficiency. Treatment is easy and includes taking a B-12 lozenge. Since B-12 is difficult to absorb through the stomach, the lozenges are more effective on the tongue. Many people who are being misdiagnosed as depressed have this MCV elevation and therefore can be treated with B-12 as a healthier alternative. One of the most common nutritional deficiency in America, however, is iron. Iron is a key component in hemoglobin, which carries oxygen in the blood throughout the body. Diets full of processed food are often lacking in digestible iron. Daily supplements have proven helpful for many who know they are iron-deficient, though care should be taken to take the pills between meals, as foods can weaken their potency. Some researchers suggest iron supplementation for women during menstruation to help regulate and regain lost iron.52 The best dietary sources for iron are legumes, dark leafy greens, and fortified cereals and grains. A diet that takes regular advantage of these natural sources of iron is most recommended by nutrition professionals. Protein Energy Malnutrition in nursing homes causes the elderly to not use energy efficiently, resulting in low-energy and fatigue.53 Diets lacking in proper protein intake can lead to lowered energy levels in people of any age. The best sources of good, healthy protein come from legumes, soy products, vegetables, and grains like quinoa.

Hormones

Testing hormone levels as possible factors causing fatigue has not yet been accepted by conventional Western medicine. Saliva testing rather than blood testing is the most accurate measure of hormone levels because the hormones that emerge from saliva are active. The important hormones to test for are: estradiol level for women in menopause; DHEA to get a handle on adrenal function; cortisol, also for adrenal function; and free testosterone. Saliva testing is a marvelous advance, and the data is far more accurate that data derived from blood tests. Symptoms of hormonal imbalance include fatigue, mood swings, and low energy.  Adrenaline, thyroid, insulin, cortisol, human growth hormone, DHEA, estrogen, progesterone, testosterone and melatonin, all must be in balance for women (particularly menopausal) to not experience biochemical dysfunctions.54 Hormonal Imbalance is critical to physical, mental, and emotional health.  Chronic or prolonged imbalance, when not treated, can lead to more severe cases.55 Endocrine system imbalances cause health problems, and those hormonal imbalances frequently have chronic symptoms, such as lack of energy, pain, insomnia, arthritis, low libido, as well as others.56 Over time in the course of our lives, many of our hormone levels naturally decrease. DHEA levels, for instance, begin to taper off as we move into our thirties. But many people fail to see how that tapering-off has been affecting their overall well-being and sense of health. Dr. Edward R. Rosock puts it simply when he notes that: Unfortunately, millions of people and most medical doctors fail to realize that a youthful balance of hormones—the body's vitally important chemical messengers—is essential to overall health and well-being. If our hormones are greatly depleted—and science has demonstrated that several hormones decline in aging adults—then you could be at risk.57 Researchers have devoted a great deal of time in finding the best methods for these common hormone imbalances. Some of their findings are summarized below:
  • Susan J. Gregoire has revealed that synthetic hormones used by traditional physicians to treat women in menopause do not connect to their receptor sites. Plant-based compounded bio-identical hormones, however, work better.58
  • Thyroid health has been shown to be integral to energy levels, mental functioning, and proper appetite. The thyroid can best be supported through nutritional therapies that include amino acids, minerals, and photomorphogens.59
  • Adrenal stress, which impacts DHEA and cortisol levels, can cause fatigue, difficulty waking, and exhaustion. It can be regulated through a proper, balanced diet of natural foods and less overall sugar intake.60
  • Toxins that get into our food disrupt the flow and strength of our endocrine glands, and so disrupt the activity of our hormones. This is why certain pesticides and herbicides are labeled by the EPA as “endocrine disruptors.” Natural unprocessed foods, especially from local organic farms, are recommended for optimal hormonal health throughout life.61
  • DHEA supplementation has been shown to help reverse the aging process. A recent study at the University of California School of Medicine reported that nearly all who participated in the research told of “a remarkable increase in self-perceived physical and psychological well-being, including improved quality of sleep, less anxiety, increased energy, and better ability to handle stress.”62
  • A progenitor of both testosterone and estrogen, DHEA has also been shown to increase libido and sexual enjoyment in women. Other research has found similar effects through the judicious supplementation of testosterone.63

Biological Testing

Did you know that chronological age does not necessarily correspond to biological age? You may be forty, but your cells and your biochemistry may be eighty. This can be tested. Generally, the biochemical tests available to those who are concerned with their true biological age include the following:
  • Estrogen
  • Testosterone
  • DHEA
  • Human Growth Hormone
  • Thyroid
  • Triglycerides
  • Lipid Profile

Glucose and Cholesterol

These tests should be done during an eight-to ten hour fast, otherwise glucose and cholesterol levels will be skewed. Properly interpreted cholesterol levels have to take in several factors: the total cholesterol and the subdivisions of HDL and LDL. The HDL, or good cholesterol, removes cholesterol from the cells and sends it back to the liver. By carrying around the bad LDL, HDL acts as a buffer for it, keeping it from causing mischief. A healthy cholesterol count should have a higher amount of HDL to LDL a part of the total count. The lower the ratio of LDL to HDL the better, with the optimum level approximately 2 to 1. The best way to raise HDL levels is through exercise. Aerobic exercise three times a week for 30 minutes is the minimum requirement to raise good cholesterol levels. The glucose level has to be considered as only one moment in time; a fasting glucose level, for example, only tells part of the story, but it is a start. Laboratories will tell you that a normal glucose level is between 65 and 110. But that’s wrong—your range should not go below 70 or over 105. Diabetes is defined at 145 or higher glucose. A traditional physician will accept a level of 115. A complementary physician would want to optimize that glucose and get it below 100.

Thyroid

Because optimal thyroid function is essential to provide appropriate energy levels, prevent weight gain, proper immune function, it is necessary to take an extra moment to discuss testing methods for this important gland.64 Some research has shown evidence of faulty testing in traditional Western practices. For instance, a recent study showed that hypothyroidism has been known to occur in spite of traditional anemia tests showing normal health.65 It is estimated that at least 10 million women have a low-grade thyroid dysfunction, but are not properly diagnosed.  Blood tests for thyroid function are frequently inaccurate, as evidenced above.66 The Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) blood test is the most accurate of the three major thyroid tests. As the thyroid is weakening, the pituitary gland has to give the thyroid more instructions about how to get going, thereby elevating TSH. This is the first indication that there is a challenge to the thyroid. Easily, 10 percent of the time, our thyroid gland is malfunctioning at some level. But that level is currently beyond our ability to test. A better indicator for TSH than a blood test is the Barnes Metabolic Morning Temperature. In this test a thermometer is placed under the arm for ten minutes as you lay flat in bed. A temperature of over 97.6 indicates a normal thyroid level. These are the basic tests for a chronic low-energy level. Tests exist for a variety of health issues. It’s good to know what your levels are—though not absolutely necessary—when you begin your detoxification program. In this way, you’ll know where you need more adjustments of nutrients, vitamins, enzymes, and other important health-giving substances for your body. This is the beginning of your journey, the benefits of which you will only know as you start experiencing them by living differently than you do now. Once the rationale for greater health and how to achieve it are broken down for you, step by step, nothing will be overwhelming. You just have to stay the course.   Notes to Chapter One:
  1. Knopper, Melissa. “Behind the Label: Processed Foods Serve Up Questionable Additives”, Green Living/E Magazine, February 2007 pp 40-41.
  2. Knopper, Melissa. “Behind the Label: Processed Foods Serve Up Questionable Additives”, Green Living/E Magazine, February 2007 pp 40-41.
  3. Bayol, Stephanie A.; Macharia, Raymond; Farrington, Samantha J.; Simbi, Bigboy H.; and Stickland, Neil C.; “Evidence that a Maternal ‘Junk Food’ Diet During Pregnancy and Lactation can Reduce Muscle Force in Offspring”, European Journal of Nutrition, Vol 48, Number 41, 2009, pp 62-65.
  4. Hennig, Bernhard; Ettinger, Adrienne; Jandacek, Ronald; Koo, Sung; McClain, Craig; Seifried, Harold; Silversone, Allen; Watkins, Bruce; and Suk, William A. “Úsing Nutrition for Intervention and Prevention Against Environmental Chemical Toxicity and Associated Diseases”, Environmental Health Perspectives, Vol 115, Number 4, April 2007, pp 493-495.
  5. Cicchetti, Tara Jane. ”Homeopathy, Healing, and Transformation”, News Life Journal, July 2008, pp 27.
  6. Iwu, Maurice M; Gbodossou, Erick. “The Role of Traditional Medicine”, The Lancet Perspectives, Vol 356, Dec 2000:  s3
  7. Sylvester, Emma. “Alternative Complementary Therapies That Hospitals are Starting to Offer”, Tampa Bay Wellness, August 2008.
  8. Bayol, Stephanie A.; Macharia, Raymond; Farrington, Samantha J.; Simbi, Bigboy H.; and Stickland, Neil C.; “Evidence that a Maternal ‘Junk Food’ Diet During Pregnancy and Lactation can Reduce Muscle Force in Offspring”, European Journal of Nutrition, Vol 48, Number 41, 2009, pp 62-65.
  9. Russo, Gian Luigi. “Ins and Outs of Dietary Phytochemicals in Cancer Chemoprevention”, Biochemical Pharmacology, vol 74, 2007, pp.533-544.
  10. Liu, Rui Hai. “Health Benefits of Fruit and Vegetables are from Additive and Synergistic Combinations of Phytochemicals,” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2003; 75:517S-20S.
  11. Joseph, James A., Barbara Shukitt-Hale, Natalia A. Denisova, Donna Bielinski, Antonio Martin, John J. McEwen, and Paula C. Bickford, ”Reversals of Age-Related Declines in Neuronal Signal Transduction, Cognitive, and Motor Behavioral Deficits with Blueberry, Spinach, or Strawberry Dietary Supplementation”, The Journal of Neuroscience, Sept 1999, 19(18):8114-8121.
  12. Hennig, Bernhard; Ettinger, Adrienne; Jandacek, Ronald; Koo, Sung; McClain, Craig; Seifried, Harold; Silversone, Allen; Watkins, Bruce; and Suk, William A. “Úsing Nutrition for Intervention and Prevention Against Environmental Chemical Toxicity and Associated Diseases”, Environmental Health Perspectives, Vol 115, Number 4, April 2007, pp 493-495.
  13. Cicchetti, Tara Jane. ”Homeopathy, Healing, and Transformation”, News Life Journal, July 2008, pp 27.
  14. Iwu, Maurice M; Gbodossou, Erick. “The Role of Traditional Medicine”, The Lancet Perspectives, Vol 356, Dec 2000:  s3
  15. Devanur, L.D., Kerr, J.R., “Chronic Fatigue Syndrome”, Journal of Clinical Virology, vol 37, 2006, pp 143.
  16. Ali, Majid. “The Dysox State and Chronic Parasitic Infestation,” Townsend Letter, July 2006, pp 82-84.
  17. O’Keefe, S.A., ”A Paradigm Shift in the Study of Gastrointestinal Parasites: Sources, Causes, Diagnosis, and Treatment”, Nutritional Perspectives: Journal of the Council on Nutrition2008 Apr 31 (2): 25-9, 31-2.
  18. Ali, Majid. “The Dysox State and Chronic Parasitic Infestation,” Townsend Letter, July 2006, pp 82-84.
  19. Toohey, Lynn. “The Nutritional Connection to ‘Leaky Gut’“, the American Chiropractor, Vol 24, Issue 4, 2002 pp 18-20.
  20. Price, DM. “Protein-energy malnutrition among the elderly: implications for nursing care.” Holistic Nursing Practice, 2008 Nov-Dec 22 (6): 355-60.
  21. Sylvester, Emma. “Alternative Complementary Therapies That Hospitals are Starting to Offer”, Tampa Bay Wellness, August 2008.
  22. Russo, Gian Luigi. “Ins and Outs of Dietary Phytochemicals in Cancer Chemoprevention”, Biochemical Pharmacology, vol 74, 2007, pp.533-544.
  23. Liu, Rui Hai. “Health Benefits of Fruit and Vegetables are from Additive and Synergistic Combinations of Phytochemicals,” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2003; 75:517S-20S.
  24. Joseph, James A., Barbara Shukitt-Hale, Natalia A. Denisova, Donna Bielinski, Antonio Martin, John J. McEwen, and Paula C. Bickford, ”Reversals of Age-Related Declines in Neuronal Signal Transduction, Cognitive, and Motor Behavioral Deficits with Blueberry, Spinach, or Strawberry Dietary Supplementation”, The Journal of Neuroscience, Sept 1999, 19(18):8114-8121.
  25. Liu, Rui Hai. “Health Benefits of Fruit and Vegetables are from Additive and Synergistic Combinations of Phytochemicals,” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2003; 75:517S-20S.
  26. Liu, Rui Hai. “Health Benefits of Fruit and Vegetables are from Additive and Synergistic Combinations of Phytochemicals,” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2003; 75:517S-20S.
  27. Joseph, James A., et al. "Reversals of Age-Related Declines in Neuronal Signal Transduction, Cognitive, and Motor Behavioral Deficits with Blueberry, Spinach, or Strawberry Dietary Supplementation." The Journal of Neuroscience 19, no. 18 (September 1999): 8114-8121.
  28. Joseph, James A., et al. "Reversals of Age-Related Declines in Neuronal Signal Transduction, Cognitive, and Motor Behavioral Deficits with Blueberry, Spinach, or Strawberry Dietary Supplementation." The Journal of Neuroscience 19, no. 18 (September 1999): 8114-8121.
  29. Joseph, James A., et al. "Reversals of Age-Related Declines in Neuronal Signal Transduction, Cognitive, and Motor Behavioral Deficits with Blueberry, Spinach, or Strawberry Dietary Supplementation." The Journal of Neuroscience 19, no. 18 (September 1999): 8114-8121.
  30. Joseph, James A., et al. "Reversals of Age-Related Declines in Neuronal Signal Transduction, Cognitive, and Motor Behavioral Deficits with Blueberry, Spinach, or Strawberry Dietary Supplementation." The Journal of Neuroscience 19, no. 18 (September 1999): 8114-8121.
  31. Russo, Gian Luigi. "Ins and Outs of Dietary Phytochemicals in Cancer Chemoprevention." Biochemcial Pharmacology 74 (2007): 533-544.
  32. Russo, Gian Luigi. "Ins and Outs of Dietary Phytochemicals in Cancer Chemoprevention." Biochemcial Pharmacology 74 (2007): 533-544.
  33. Liu, Rui Hai. "Health Benefits of Fruit and Vegetables are from Additive and Synergistic Combinations of Phytochemicals." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 75 (2003): 517S-20S.
  34. Liu, Rui Hai. "Health Benefits of Fruit and Vegetables are from Additive and Synergistic Combinations of Phytochemicals." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 75 (2003): 517S-20S.
  35. Devanur, L.D., Kerr, J.R., “Chronic Fatigue Syndrome”, Journal of Clinical Virology, vol 37, 2006, pp139-150, pp140.
  36. Karst, Karlene. “The Inedibles: Overcoming Food Allergies”, Alive: Canadian Journal of Health and Nutrition, March 2005, pp. 76-77.
  37. HØSt, Arne, and Halken, Susanne. “Primary Prevention of Food Allergy in Infants who are at Risk”, Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 2005, 5:255-259.
  38. HØSt, Arne, and Halken, Susanne. “Primary Prevention of Food Allergy in Infants who are at Risk”, Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 2005, 5:255-259.
  39. Dunstan, Janet A., Prescott, Susan L. “Does Fish Oil Supplementation in Pregnancy Reduce the Risk of Allergic Disease in Infants?”, Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 2005, 5:215-221.
  40. Dunstan, Janet A., Prescott, Susan L. “Does Fish Oil Supplementation in Pregnancy Reduce the Risk of Allergic Disease in Infants?”, Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 2005, 5:215-221.
  41. Dunstan, Janet A., Prescott, Susan L. “Does Fish Oil Supplementation in Pregnancy Reduce the Risk of Allergic Disease in Infants?”, Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 2005, 5:215-221.
  42. Karst, Karlene. "The Inedibles: Overcoming Food Allergies." Alive: Canadian Journal of Health and Nutrition, March 2005: 76-77.
  43. Karst, Karlene. "The Inedibles: Overcoming Food Allergies." Alive: Canadian Journal of Health and Nutrition, March 2005: 76-77.
  44. Devanur, L.D., Kerr, J.R., “Chronic Fatigue Syndrome”, Journal of Clinical Virology, vol 37, 2006, pp139-150, pp140.
  45. Devanur, L.D., Kerr, J.R., “Chronic Fatigue Syndrome”, Journal of Clinical Virology, vol 37, 2006, pp 143.
  46. Devanur, L.D., Kerr, J.R., “Chronic Fatigue Syndrome”, Journal of Clinical Virology, vol 37, 2006, pp 143.
  47. Devanur, L.D., Kerr, J.R., “Chronic Fatigue Syndrome”, Journal of Clinical Virology, vol 37, 2006, pp 143.
  48. Ali, Majid. “The Dysox State and Chronic Parasitic Infestation,” Townsend Letter, July 2006, pp 82-84.
  49. O’Keefe, S.A., ”A Paradigm Shift in the Study of Gastrointestinal Parasites: Sources, Causes, Diagnosis, and Treatment”, Nutritional Perspectives: Journal of the Council on Nutrition2008 Apr 31 (2): 25-9, 31-2.
  50. Ali, Majid. “The Dysox State and Chronic Parasitic Infestation,” Townsend Letter, July 2006, pp 82-84.
  51. Toohey, Lynn. “The Nutritional Connection to ‘Leaky Gut’“, the American Chiropractor, Vol 24, Issue 4, 2002 pp 18-20.
  52. Webb, Denise. "Beat Low Energy Blahs: Low Iron May Be To Blame." Prevention 53, no. 8 (August 2001): 55.
  53. Price, DM. “Protein-energy malnutrition among the elderly: implications for nursing care.” Holistic Nursing Practice, 2008 Nov-Dec 22 (6): 355-60.
  54. Gregoire, Susan J., “The Hormone profile-What’s it all about?”, New Times Naturally, June 2007, p 50.
  55. Osborn, Annie. “The Truth About Hormone Imbalance”, Share Guide, Nov 2006, p 31.
  56. Riggin, Mary. “The US Food Supply is Linked to Hormone Problems”, New Times Naturally, August 2007, p45.
  57. “Male and Female Hormone Testing: An Underutilized Tool,” by Dr. Edward R. Rosock, DO, MPH, Life Extension 49, Nov. 2006.
  58. Gregoire, Susan J. "The Hormone Profile: What's it all About?" New Times Naturally, June 2007: 50
  59. Eistein, M. "Thyroid Hormone Testing." Journal of Complementary Medicine, Nov/Dec 2008: 36.
  60. Gregoire, Susan J. "The Hormone Profile: What's it all About?" New Times Naturally, June 2007: 50.
  61. Osborn, Annie. "The Truth About Hormone Imbalance." Share Guide, November 2006: 31.
  62. Gregoire, Susan J. "The Hormone Profile: What's it all About?" New Times Naturally, June 2007: 50.
  63. Osborn, Annie. "The Truth About Hormone Imbalance." Share Guide, November 2006: 31.
  64. Eistein, M. “Thyroid Hormone Testing”, Journal of Complementary Medicine, Nov/Dec 2008, p 36.
  65. Fitzgerald, Margaret A., “Fight Fatigue by Evaluating Thyroid Function”, Nurse Practitioner, Dec 2008, Vol 33 Issue 12, p6-7.
  66. Murphree, Rodger. “Sick and Tired of Being Sick and Tired”, The American Chiropractor, Septmber 2008, p14-16.
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